Login
 
RSS Feed Twitter Facebook YouTube

Assassins Creed Review

In the beautiful world of Assassin’s Creed, we follow two main characters through the incredibly different worlds of modern day 2012 with Desmond Miles, and the 12th century master assassin, Altaïr Ibn-La’Ahad. Fighting against the Templar Order to prevent no less than world domination, Assassin’s Creed brings a well put together mix of exciting swordplay, fighting sequences, a gripping and deeply involving story, and a fun twist of stealth game-play that is sure to leave the player satisfied.

 

The game is broken down into three primary cities: Damascus, Acre, and Jerusalem. All of which are rendered in beautiful detail. Whether you’re traversing the streets, or running along the rooftops, you find plenty of entertaining ways to take out your enemies or simply explore for the hundreds of collectibles throughout the game. On street level, you’re bombarded with the sights and sounds of merchants, orators preaching to the masses, guards harassing innocent bystanders, the bustle of a market, but at the same time the developers made it remarkably easy to still discern what you need to hear for your objectives. On the rooftops you hear the wind breeze by you, the flapping of birds flying by you as you peer down unto the cityscape, and it can be remarkably peaceful until you take the “Leap Of Faith” down the sheer face of a tower into a hay bale below.

Historical accuracy in Assassin’s Creed was incredible. As Altaïr, you’re sent to kill 9 Templar leaders. Come to find out that all 9 of these men actually existed and were all killed or somehow died within the time period of the game. This, tied together with the conspiracy theory of the Templars trying to find mystical artifacts and achieve world conquest, was also somewhat accurate and made very believable. Even the voice actors (with the exception of Altaïr sadly) were all accurate to the intonations and accents with which they spoke for that time period.

 

The storyline sucks the player into its depth, getting increasingly better as it progresses. Finding out that Altaïr isn’t a saint and that not all the Templars are truly evil, brings a new side to the plot as well. Both sides of the conflict are flawed and no one is truly who they say to be. The combat is surprisingly fluid, with Altaïr switching from one stance to another without glitches, seamlessly dispatching groups of enemies without the player having to learn complicated control sequences and without button mashing. Almost anyone could pick up the controller and within minutes be fighting large numbers of enemies without much trouble.

 

Having given the game credit were its due, there are a few downsides as well. About halfway through the story, the game becomes very repetitive. Missions break down to gathering information on your target by eavesdropping on conversations, pickpocketing information, and beating up certain targets in order to interrogate them. You find yourself doing these over and over, and quite frankly it gets old very quickly. The luster of different kills goes away at this point as well, with the player exhausting their methods by this time. If you can see past these few flaws, this is truly an amazing game.

 

The ending leaves players wanting more as it is very open-ended and leaves much unanswered. Knowing that sequels were on the way, many fans were excited and this spawned an internet short series called “Assassins Creed Lineage”, which depicts the events leading into Assassin’s Creed 2. In the words of Altaïr, “Nothing is true, everything is permitted,” this series sticks right to the letter. I highly recommend this game to anyone looking for a change of pace and a highly involved storyline with fast paced action.

 

7 out of 10

1 Comment

Leave A Reply
  1. Mike C says
    January 31, 2012, 4:17 AM

    Nice review. I’m about a quarter of the way thru the game (for the first time) and the author spells out an accurate recreation of the game play so far.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com